Tag Archives: request for production of documents

Civil Litigation 101: Maryland Rule 2-432. Motions upon failure to provide discovery.

Maryland Courts do not like it when parties to a lawsuit fail to cooperate in discovery. So, what happens when you (or your attorney) have issued Interrogatories and a Request for Production of Documents to your party opponent, and your party opponent has failed to provide you with responses as required by the Maryland Rules? […]

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Civil Litigation 101: What are Requests for Admissions?

In this Civil Litigation 101 blog series, I’ve discussed two important discovery tools: Interrogatories and Requests for Production of Documents. Another — often underutilized — tool undertaken in the discovery phase of a lawsuit are Requests for Admissions. However, unlike Interrogatories and Requests for Production of Documents, Requests for Admissions are not designed to seek […]

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Civil Litigation 101: Requests for Production of Documents

Like interrogatories (which were discussed in the previous blog: Civil Litigation 101: What are Interrogatories?) a Request for Production of Documents is a useful tool for lawyers to gather information during the discovery phase of litigation. A Request for Production of Documents, simply, is a formal written request directed to an opposing party to provide […]

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Civil Litigation 101: Maryland Sample Products Liability Interrogatories

In this “Civil Litigation 101″ blog series, I’ve provided the reader with Maryland Form domestic relations interrogatories, Maryland Form motor tort interrogatories, and Maryland Form personal injury interrogatories. In continuing with this series, the following Maryland Form interrogatories can be useful in products liability cases. As always, the rules governing interrogatories differ depending on where […]

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Civil Litigation 101 – What is Discovery?

So, you’ve filed a civil lawsuit against someone or some entity. Now what? A lot happens between the time one actually begins the litigation process and the time when one actually gets his/her day in court. In Maryland, to litigate a case from inception (filing a Complaint) to end (trial) can take a few months […]

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